Cuban Doctor Cured of Ebola Plans to Return to West Africa

 

A Cuban doctor who contracted Ebola in West Africa, and subsequently cured in Switzerland, has said he plans to return to the region to further fight the virus. My friend Sam Tabar posted about it this morning.

Dr. Felix Baez, 43, contracted the illness in mid November. He became feverish on November 16th in Sierra Leone. On November 20th he was transferred to Switzerland to be treated. He was allowed to return home to Havana Cuba on December 6th, where he remains free of the virus.

Baez was treated with experimental durgs. Zmab, similar in nature to Zmapp which was used in several other Ebola cases, was used on the doctor, in conjunction with a Japanese flu remedy.

The doctor has spent the last month recuperating and enjoying time with his family and friends.

Family claim they are not surprised by Baez’s desire to return. He’s has a deep dedication to the cause, and would like to continue to do his part to eradicate the virus from West Africa, where it has revaged the region, killing almost 8,000 and infection nearly 20,000, by some reports.

Eigg Island Is Almost 100% Sustainable

Eigg Island, off the coast of Scotland, is working hard towards its goal of being 100% self-sustainable. The imitative, that was begun in 2008 is about to come to fruition in the new year. The Island cut ties with the United Kingdom in 1997, and since then they’ve created a self-sustaining society that wants for very little.

They switched on a 2.64 million electricity grid in 2008 that cut their ties with the United Kingdom, for good. Because large power companies would not service the small island, they simply created their own system, which utilizes the abundant sun, water and wind that are found on the island.

Resident have worked hard at sustainability, utilizing limited fossil fuels and capping electric output to just 5 kilowatts per home, and 10 kilowatts per business. They are also utilizing renewable resources, which accounts for 90% of all energy utilized on the island.

They also utilize their fishing prowess to feed their residents and heating is free in public spaces. The island and its residents have taken to sustainability in spades, and have set forth a precedent that the rest of the world can follow. They have shown, by and large, that sustainability is, in fact, attainable.

Eigg’s initiative has worked so seamlessly because residents like Gianfrancesco Geno have a vested interest in the health and wellness of the land. They banned together in 1997, states a post on jusbrasil.com.br, to buy the property that the island sits on.

While Eigg is a bit Utopian, and it is unlikely to be replicated in larger areas, their example can be utilized in larger cities to a certain extent.